Thursday, October 23, 2014

How to Provide Real-Time Feedback with Kaizena

Kaizena is an excellent web-based tool that allows educators to provide high quality verbal and textual feedback with less time and effort than traditional assessment methods. Students are the real benefactors; however, as current research strongly suggests that audio file feedback is preferred by most students because it allows for a clear and more detailed assessment that is tailored to each individual student (King, D., McGugan, S., & Bunyan, N., 2008). In essence, students are more engaged in the learning process because Kaizena allows students to receive personalized feedback that is more inspiring of improvement. 

Kaizena's impressive functionality is also highlighted by the following features:

- a tracking/rating system for skills and/or content.

- a tagging option to easily locate previously documented learning resources.

- an on-demand actionable resources library that students can access via hyperlink.


How To Get Started:




Sample Activities:

Click here to start sharing your ideas with other educators. Please feel free to access this resource in the future as more ideas are added on a regular basis.


Teach-nology:
(the pedagogical rationale for the use of technology in the classroom)  

Skill

Teach-nology


Literacy


  • To demonstrate the ability to use language to read, write, listen and speak.
  • To evaluate feedback constructively and and competently.

Make Judgments & Decisions




  • To reflect critically on learning experiences and processes.


Reason Effectively


  • To use various types of reasoning (e.g. inductive, deductive, etc.) to improve one's written output or comprehensive of the content.


Kaizena is quickly gaining a reputation as a go-to student feedback tool for educators. To get started, click here!


This post originally appeared on The De-tech-tive 4 Teachers technology blog.

King, D., McGugan, S., & Bunyan, N. (2008). Does it make a difference? Replacing text with audio 

     feedback. Practice and Evidence of Scholarship of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education, 3 (2), 145-


     163.

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